« Back to all news

Headmaster's Blog

The Value of Getting Spaced Out

posted on November 20th 2018 in Headmaster's Blog

If you were to analyse the challenges that school pupils face you would find a variety of individual issues – some struggle with note-taking, some are brilliant verbally but find it difficult to do themselves justice when writing essays, others freeze when faced with applying existing knowledge in novel contexts. But the one thing which

Read More »

Three Steps to Learning Heaven (Behaviour)

posted on November 13th 2018 in Headmaster's Blog

Over my last two blogs I have outlined ‘three steps to learning heaven.’ Three key areas of school life that any school needs to take a long hard look at if it is going to become exceptional in its culture and learning outcomes. These three areas are as follows: Curriculum content (i.e. what pupils spend

Read More »

Three Steps to Learning Heaven (Marking & Feedback)

posted on November 6th 2018 in Headmaster's Blog

In my last blog I outlined ‘three steps to learning heaven.’ Three key areas of school life that any school needs to take a long hard look at if it is going to become exceptional in its culture and learning outcomes. These three areas are as follows: Curriculum content (i.e. what pupils spend their time

Read More »

Three Steps to Learning Heaven (Curriculum Content)

posted on October 30th 2018 in Headmaster's Blog

Everyone acknowledges that in many UK schools, teachers are dangerously overworked yet as a country we are out performed educationally by far too many other nations. This points to one obvious conclusion, that more of the same in terms of teacher workload is not the way forward and that, instead, we need to take a

Read More »

Let it Flow

posted on October 2nd 2018 in Headmaster's Blog

Noel Coward once observed that ‘work is more fun than what most people call fun’. I am not sure I would have agreed with him when I was twenty-five, but now I am closing in on fifty I can definitely see his point. No job is fun all the time, otherwise someone would come along

Read More »

Making a Noise for Quiet People

posted on September 13th 2018 in Headmaster's Blog

In modern schooling we are expected, quite rightly, to consider the experience and needs of children with dyslexia, dyspraxia, ADD and other special educational needs. I think, however, that there is a much larger group of people (probably around half the population) who can very easily be marginalised and even oppressed by the contemporary educational

Read More »

Senior Deputy Head’s Blog – Prize-Giving Ceremonies

posted on July 5th 2018 in Headmaster's Blog

Are Prize-Giving ceremonies elitist and demotivating? The Guardian reported in July 2017 findings from a survey that 57% of parents with children in primary school said their sports day was ‘non-competitive’.  In 2015 The Telegraph ran an article on how at Eton years ago all boys were herded into the school hall and their exam

Read More »

Headmasters’ Blog – Anomie

posted on June 28th 2018 in Headmaster's Blog

Mental Health, Anomie and Schools.  In The Times recently there was an article which states that, “Family doctors say that they are the ‘new clergy’ and need to know what to do when patients come to them lacking meaning and purpose in life.’ This is a new one on me, and would appear to be

Read More »

Headmasters’ Blog – Co-Ed Debate

posted on June 21st 2018 in Headmaster's Blog

Co-ed versus single-sex education: a debate without substance. Given that our Senior School has recently taken the decision to admit boys with effect from September 2019, it seems timely to put down my thoughts on the long-standing educational and social debate of whether co-ed or single sex schooling is preferable. When considering any question such

Read More »

Headmaster Blog – Kids are not alright

posted on June 14th 2018 in Headmaster's Blog

The kids are not alright, but that’s nothing to get worried about. I am occasionally baffled by the extent to which colleagues who have been working with teenagers for years are prone to express sudden and genuine outrage at the fact that a pupil has been particularly self-centred, aggressive, impulsive or moody. Mental health (or,

Read More »